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James 3:18 – Peacemakers (June 14)

Hello and thanks for joining in on to today’s daily devotion. Today is Tuesday. June 14th. The 3rd day of the Hebraic week.

Our verse today is James 3:18.

James 3:18
Peacemakers who sow in peace raise a harvest of righteousness.

Peacemakers. What is a peace maker? Well, I guess that depends on who you ask right? Some will say a peacemaker is one who wears a light blue helmet and holds a machine gun. But can you really force peace? Can we really take that mentality and bring it into the Body of Messiah?

Yet, how often do we see that being attempted? People trying to force their version of peace. People saying how we need unity in the Body of Messiah yet they imply how all has to come to their understanding of the truth. Saying that there won’t be peace and unity unless we come to their understanding.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for unity and peace. I just struggle when I hear someone say that it won’t come until we submit their version of it. For me, I can only tell you that a peacemaker is one who tries to bring peace in the midst of disagreement. Agreeing to disagree. You can’t force peace. You just can’t. It takes a willingness on both sides.

It seems that a peace maker is not one who forces or coerces a particular mindset or view. Rather, it seems a peace maker is one who tries to quiet the storm between two opponents. To not necessarily have the answer but to calm a situation until the one with the answer comes.

So are you a peace maker? If so, what kind? Do you try to force your peace? Or do you try to calm a situation down with the anticipation for Messiah to come and bring the answer?

Let this be a focus in your time of meditation throughout the day. Until tomorrow, shalom!

Here's something interesting to consider: